Tag: John Robertson

John Robertson painting large scale painting on canvas at Santa Paula Art Museum

John Robertson Painting Demonstration

Cassandra Tondro posted on her blog a nice piece about my painting ( John Robertson ) demonstration at the Santa Paula Art Museum.  Here is a link to Cassandra’s website “about” page.  I have known Cassandra For a number of years when I lived in the Los Angeles area.  We attended the same art salon in Santa Monica that met once s month.  Her work is beautiful, using bright colors and in unusual ways.  Go to her website to see them.   The work I like of hers are the Botanical Ecoprints she makes.

Here is a short description from her website explaining what the Botanical Ecoprints are:

“Using fallen leaves collected on neighborhood walks, I create one-of-a-kind ecoprints made by steaming leaves against paper. No inks, dyes or paints are used — just the colors from the plants themselves.

On the way to the trash, the plant material takes a detour through my studio to leave its imprint as art before being tossed onto the compost heap.

The ecoprints have an ethereal feel. They beckon us to slow down, quiet our minds, take a closer look, and appreciate the spirit of the trees. The colors of the prints are a whisper of reality, their patterns a pale and delicate gift at the end of the leaves’ brief lives.”

John Robertson Painting Demonstration

What a treat! I got to see one of my favorite painters, artist John Robertson, do a painting demonstration at the Santa Paula Art Museum today. John starts with a black outline of his portrait, and fills in with his very loose style of painting. He’s also very funny and entertaining to watch. John uses house paints for his work, and he’s the person who first got me interested in house paint for my art many years ago.

Artist John Robertson

Artist John Robertson

Artist John Robertson Ventura, CA

Artist John Robertson

Three of artist  John Robertson’s finished paintings were on display on the museum floor. These are very large paintings — like 8 feet x 4  feet or so.

Artist John Robertson

Artist John Robertson

I’m a big fan of John’s work! He does portraits of sports stars for stadiums as well as portraits of regular folks. Very fun and creative!

John Robertson Large scale painting of a tattooist painted on canvas used in a painting demonstration

Gallery Talk Santa Paula Art Museum

Gallery Talk Painting Demonstration John Robertson

The Santa Paula Art Museum has invited John Robertson to speak and and give a painting demonstration and gallery talk about  large-scale figurative painting. 3:00 PM, Thursday, March 10. Please join me at:

John Robertson Large scale painting of a tattooist painted on canvas used in a painting demonstration
Figurative Painting of Luis by Artist John Robertson is 40″ x 84″ ink and acrylic on unstretched canvas

Santa Paula Art Museum,117 North 10th Street, Santa Paula, Ca.

$4 Adults, $3 Seniors, Students and museum members free

The painting you see in the photograph is of Luis, a tattoo artist who works in a tattoo shop in the same complex where my studio is located. As you can see, he is covered in tattoos including his face. He has plenty of piercings also. Luis has been tattooing for about twenty years and is quite an accomplished artist. He paints in oils and not surprisingly his subject matter tends towards the dark side. This painting is 40″ by 84″ ink and acrylic on unstretched canvas.

The Santa Paula Art Museum has gallery talks every second Thursday of the month at 3:00 pm for talk and tour through the Museum’s galleries led by guest curators, artists, and experts.

Abraham Lincoln Gettysburg Address16th President of the United Stated

Abraham Lincoln Portrait Gettysburg Address

    Portrait of Abraham Lincoln

I originally painted this wall-sized, black and white portrait of Abraham Lincoln because it seems the Gettysburg Address is just as important today as it was when Lincoln gave the speech – and  just wanted to paint it  for the fun of it. I like the whole idea of using an iconic

Abraham Lincoln Gettysburg Address16th President of the United Stated
Portrait of President Abraham Lincoln painted in black and white 5 feet by 6 feet, acrylic on unstretched canvas

image for a painting. Most artists paint contemporary figures but, in this case, I wanted to paint the image of our 16th President which carries echoes of our historical past.   One of my favorite quotes of Abe Lincoln is timely.  ” America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.”

And this seems a good as place as any for one to read the Gettysburg Address – probably one of the greatest speeches of all time.   What is surprising to lot of people is how short it is. 271 words long. Only a couple of minutes reading time – but a good read.  Worth the time.

The Gettysburg Address:

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

 Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

 But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

For those, like myself, life things explained to them, here is a good and simple analysis of the Gettysburg Address.