Tag: portraits

portraits paintings musicians Sol Soloman

Portraits Paintings Musicians Sol Soloman

Portraits Paintings Musicians – Sol Solman

I had met the musician Sol Soloman over ten years ago.  I was invited to a recording up in a studio session on Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood for the absolutely great song writer P.F Slown. P.F. Sloan had written some of the greatest hits of the sixties, “Eve of Destruction” “Secret Agent Man”, etc. and was recording some new music.

portrait of musician Sol Soloman
Sol Solomon musician
4 1/2 feet by 6 feet
acrylic on unstretched canvas

P.F died a few months ago. Sol was there for back-up with a number of other great musicians.  The great bass player Phil Chen bassist for Jeff Beck, Rod Stewart and countless others was there. I have painted him also and will post his portrait at some future date.  There was another great musician there, Bernard Fowler who was a back up singer and toured and recorded with the “The Stones”  (who I also painted and will post sometime)

Breakthrough Painting

Sol had this great look that I had to paint.  At the time I had been painting portraits for about six months and had not been able to do a very good job of painting them.  And when I first tried to paint Sol Soloman I also struggled.  The first couple of portraits musicians painting of Sol was not very good  and I usually just “forget about it” and go on and paint someone else.  But in this case, I really wanted to get a good painting.  And with a great bit of effort over a number of days I finally was able to create the painting of Sol Soloman.  A few years later, after meeting him, he tragically passed away.

I have probably painted three-hundred-and-fifty portraits paintings musicians and this is my favorite.  I probably have created over two thousand pieces of art and this is in the top five paintings I have created.  Although, a number of times people have come along and wanted to buy it, it is not for sale.  Meeting Sol Soloman was very meaningful and the painting itself has great meaning.  It was my breakthrough portrait painting which allowed me to grow as a portrait artist.

Portraits paintings by artist John Robertson

Portrait Musician Slowrider Painting

Portrait Musician 

Portrait musician David Gomez keyboardist from the group Slowrider. Around 2001/ 2006 / I was painting portraits of musicians playing at The Temple Bar in Santa Monica, ca.

Portraits paintings by artist John Robertson
Musician Gomez from group Slow Rider

I went to the club a couple of times a week and hung around to find interesting faces to paint. Obviously David Gomez has and interesting look. Over a period of time I probably painted 250 musicians. The paintings were all about the same size 50” x 70” acrylic on unstretched canvas. At any given time there was about 15 portraits hanging inside the club and in the front windows 4 hung facing Wilshire Blvd. at 11th St.

About Slowrider

At the time I painted this portrait the group Slowrider was part of the new wave of Chicano bands coming out of Los Angeles. They were blending sounds Brazilian and Caribbean rhythms, Spanish, Spanglish, hip hop, bilingualism, etc. and Mexican music. There was also some political overtones.  Here is a link to more current East Los Angeles latino bands on the music scene. Although I had followed a lot of bands when painting some of the local Los Angeles musicians I did not stay In touch. There were and still are hundreds of musicians playing nightly that a are as good as any you are going to see anywhere – it is always shocking to me how they struggled just to be heard.

I read a quote from David Gomez Like a D.J., we create a collage of music and take a little from different (parts),” said David Gomez, the band’s keyboardist, in an interview with Boca magazine. “That is how we put our songs together. It isn’t about being influenced by one genre of music or a specific time of music; it’s the past coming together with the present.

Abraham Lincoln Gettysburg Address16th President of the United Stated

Abraham Lincoln Portrait Gettysburg Address

    Portrait of Abraham Lincoln

I originally painted this wall-sized, black and white portrait of Abraham Lincoln because it seems the Gettysburg Address is just as important today as it was when Lincoln gave the speech – and  just wanted to paint it  for the fun of it. I like the whole idea of using an iconic

Abraham Lincoln Gettysburg Address16th President of the United Stated
Portrait of President Abraham Lincoln painted in black and white 5 feet by 6 feet, acrylic on unstretched canvas

image for a painting. Most artists paint contemporary figures but, in this case, I wanted to paint the image of our 16th President which carries echoes of our historical past.   One of my favorite quotes of Abe Lincoln is timely.  ” America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.”

And this seems a good as place as any for one to read the Gettysburg Address – probably one of the greatest speeches of all time.   What is surprising to lot of people is how short it is. 271 words long. Only a couple of minutes reading time – but a good read.  Worth the time.

The Gettysburg Address:

Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

 Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field, as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

 But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate, we can not consecrate, we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion—that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain—that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

For those, like myself, life things explained to them, here is a good and simple analysis of the Gettysburg Address.